K Framework – An Overview

Why K

Unlike natural language, which allows interpretation and miscommunication, programming languages are meant to tell computers precisely what to do. Without a rigorous definition of a programming language that unambiguously says what each program does, also called a formal semantics, it is impossible to guarantee reliable, safe or secure operation of computing systems. K is a framework that allows you to define, or implement, the formal semantics of your programming language in an intuitive and modular way. Once you do that, K offers you a suite of tools for your language, including both an executable model and a program verifier.

Why Formal Semantics

Formal semantics of programming languages is a very old field of study, started long before many of us were born, in late 60's (Floyd-Hoare, or axiomatic semantics) to 70's (Scott-Strachey, or denotational semantics) and 80's (various types of operational semantics).

Unfortunately, formal semantics have a negative connotation among practitioners, who think that formal semantics of real programming languages are hard to define, difficult to understand, and ultimately useless. This is partly fueled by the fact that most formal semantics require a solid mathematical background to be understood and even more math to be defined, use cryptic notations that make little sense to non-logicians, such as backwards A and E symbols and a variety of Greek letters, and in the end sell themselves as "helping you better understand your language" and nothing else. Continue reading