IELE: A New Virtual Machine for the Blockchain

IELE and K Team
Runtime Verification (RV) is proud to release their first version of IELE, a new virtual machine for the blockchain.

IELE Team Photo, left to right: Daejun Park (PhD student at UIUC, RV intern); Theodoros Kasampalis (PhD student at UIUC, RV intern); Yi Zhang (PhD student at UIUC, RV intern); Traian Serbanuta (RV; screen, left bottom); Grigore Rosu (RV president/CEO and UIUC professor; screen, center, taking the picture); Virgil Serbanuta (RV; screen, right bottom); David Young (RV); Brandon Moore (RV); Yiyi Wang (RV); Dwight Guth (RV).

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ERC20-K: Formal Executable Specification of ERC20

ERC20
The ERC20 standard is one of the most important standards for the implementation of tokens within Ethereum smart contracts. ERC20 provides basic functionality to transfer tokens and to be approved so they can be spent by another on-chain third party. Unfortunately, ERC20 leaves several corner cases unspecified, which makes it less than ideal to use in the formal verification of token implementations. Indeed, we at RV, Inc., have been asked to verify smart contracts for ERC20 compliance. However, we found that it is unclear what ERC20 compliance means, because the existing presentations of ERC20 are far from serving as mathematical models of the standard token. Consequently, we decided to create ERC20-K, a mathematically rigorous formalization of ERC20, making sure that all corner cases are thought through, explicitly covered, and thoroughly tested. From here on, when we claim that we prove implementations of ERC20 tokens correct, we mean that they provably satisfy the 13 rules of ERC20-K.

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New Technologies for the Blockchain: IELE (virtual machine) and K (universal language framework)

IELE and K Team Runtime Verification has been recently awarded a research and development contract by IOHK to design a next generation virtual machine and a universal language framework to be used as core infrastructure for future blockchain technologies. The formal analysis and verification technology employed in this project has been developed and improved over more than 15 years of research and development, both in the Formal System Laboratory (FSL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and at Runtime Verification, with generous funding from organisations including NSF, NASA, DARPA, NSA, Boeing, Microsoft, Toyota, and Denso. It is about time that aircraft grade, software analysis technology used for mission critical software gets deployed to smart contracts, the blockchain and cryptocurrencies. The project will be executed by a team of Runtime Verification experts led by Prof. Rosu, who will work closely with students at the University of Illinois, also funded by IOHK, and with IOHK R&D personnel. IELE and K Team Photo, left to right: Daejun Park (PhD student at UIUC, RV intern); Theodoros Kasampalis (PhD student at UIUC, RV intern); Yi Zhang (PhD student at UIUC, RV intern); Traian Serbanuta (RV; screen, left bottom); Grigore Rosu (RV and UIUC; screen, center, taking the picture); Virgil Serbanuta (RV; screen, right bottom); David Young (RV); Brandon Moore (RV); Yiyi Wang (RV); Dwight Guth (RV). Also Chris Hathhorn (RV), who missed picture.

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Let’s Make the Ethereum Virtual Machine Better

EVM
Ethereum Virtual Machine

The Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM) has been recently given a complete formal semantics using the K framework, as part of the open source KEVM project.  The effort is described in detail in the KEVM technical report.  The aim of the KEVM project is to develop a suite of formal analysis tools for smart contracts based on the formal semantics of the EVM.  In other words, the only trust base for these tools will be the public EVM semantics, which is the best we can hope for.  The KEVM team currently consists of researchers and developers at Runtime Verification and in the Formal Systems Laboratory at the University of Illinois, and the project is being partially funded by IOHK.

K
K Framework

While defining the formal semantics of EVM in K, there were moments when we asked ourselves "Why did they do it this way?"  Also, while verifying smart contracts using the semantics, we found some of the design choices made by the EVM designers questionable; if nothing else, they make verification harder.  We have decided to then collect our thoughts during the semantic definition process and during verification of smart contracts after.  They were bundled together with the KEVM definition, under issues.md.  Here we restate them so you can find them all in one place in order to express your thoughts.  Maybe it is not too late to re-design the EVM, this time with formal semantics and mathematical rigor in mind.  If the blockchain technology is here is stay, then we should better build it on the most solid foundation that we can.

 

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ASE 2001 paper that helped shape the Runtime Verification field got the Most Influential Paper Award

Klaus Havelund and I got the ASE 2016 most influential paper award for a paper we published 15 years ago, in ASE 2001.  That paper is important to me because it turned my interest to the field that we now call "runtime verification" (back then, we didn't know exactly what it was).  Below is a link to an article that the CS Department at UIUC just published about this award.

 

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CS article

 

 

14% of SV-COMP’s “Correct Programs” are Undefined!

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Last April (2016), I gave a tutorial on K at ETAPS'16 in Eindhoven, Netherlands, where I also demonstrated RV-Match.  During the week that I spent there, I heard several friends and colleagues who were involved with the Competition on Software Verification, SV-COMP, that some of the benchmark's correct programs appear to be undefined.  What?  So some of the assumed-correct C programs that are used to evaluate the best program verifiers in the world are actually wrong programs? Continue reading